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Missouri Truck and Bus Accident Statistics – October 23, 2009

The following collision statistics were derived from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the Motor Carrier Management Information System by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). The purpose of these accident statistics is to help identify safety problems in specific geographical areas like Missouri and to compare Missouri’s statistics to the national truck and bus accident figures.

Missouri 2008 Preliminary Crash Facts

 

1,485 large trucks* and 250 buses were involved in injury crashes
2,216 injuries resulted from collisions involving large trucks and 703 injuries from collisions involving buses 4,279 large trucks and 472 buses were involved in non-fatal crashes
2,794 large trucks and 222 buses were involved in towaway crashes
58 large trucks and no buses were involved in hazmat placard crashes

Missouri 2007 Crash Facts

 

1,557 large trucks and 229 buses were involved in injury crashes

138 large trucks and 5 buses were involved in fatal crashes

136 fatalities resulted from accidents involving large trucks and 5 fatalities from crashes involving buses
2,332 injuries resulted from accidents involving large trucks and 770 injuries from collisions involving buses
4,225 large trucks and 441 buses were involved in non-fatal crashes
2,668 large trucks and 212 buses were involved in towaway crashes
68 large trucks and no buses involved in hazmat placard crashes

In 2006, The Large Truck Crash Causation Study was commissioned by FMCSA to review the causes of, and contributing factors to, accidents involving commercial motor vehicles. It was based on a three-year data collection project conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It was the first-ever national study to attempt to determine the critical events and associated factors that contribute to serious large truck crashes. This information enables the U.S. Department of Transportation and others to implement effective countermeasures to reduce the occurrence and severity of these big rig crashes.

The conclusion of the study was that action or inaction by the driver of either the truck or other vehicle was the critical reason for 88 percent of the accidents. Drivers of over the road rigs and the other vehicles involved in truck collisions were found to be ten times more likely to be the cause of the crash than other factors, such as weather, road conditions, and vehicle performance.

While previous data focused on specific accidents and/or the individual causes of the collision, this study was the first nation-wide examination of all pre-crash factors. Further analysis is needed to examine tractor trailer driver factors such as use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs, speeding, fatigue, inattention, distractions, work environment, and unfamiliarity with the road.

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* blogger’s note: “truck” in the studies refers to a vehicle designed, used, or maintained primarily for carrying property, with a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of more than 10,000 lbs. While this may mean over-the-road big rigs such as eighteen (18) wheelers, tractor trailers and semi’s, it may refer to other vehicles such as delivery trucks, Mack trucks and other commercial trucks as well.

 

 

 

 

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